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Four Pillars of Wellbeing

After deeply researching the philosophical, spiritual, and scientific literature, four key areas have surfaced that are directly related to sustainable human wellness. We have unified these approaches into a single set of lessons that offer the skills required to generate wellbeing internally. Our K-8 educational transformation offers teachers and students the opportunity to cultivate these skills at the schoolwide level. We work with schools as we continue to develop our curriculum and create a network of forward thinking classrooms that value sustainable wellbeing. The Four Pillars of Wellbeing curriculum is more than just some quick classroom exercises - it’s a transformation for the entire school.



Mindfulness

This concept has to do with cultivating focused, nonjudgmental attention to the present moment, which is a critically important practice for improving self-awareness skills. When we are being mindless, it is easy to become hijacked by intense emotions or ruminating thought patterns, because we’re not focusing our attention on what’s happening right now. When we practice mindfulness, we’re increasing the sensitivity and resolution with which we can sense the world around us and, more importantly, the world inside of us. Over 3,000 studies have been published over the past few decades on the physical, mental, and social benefits of mindfulness techniques. So far, scientists have documented hundreds of observable, reliable health outcomes that mindfulness offers even for a practice as short as 20 minutes a day. Some examples include immune system boosts, increased physical energy, reductions in addiction and trauma impact, and boosts in prosocial behaviors.

Community

Through community-building practices based on cutting-edge positive psychology research, we learn how to bring out the best in each other by bringing out the best in ourselves. Here we use the energy of the group to maximize the potential for individual development, growth, and self-awareness. Using our community-building tools, we develop cooperation, caretaking, and empathy within our classroom environments. By working together, we begin to support each other’s wellbeing goals and at the same time hold ourselves responsible for contributing to the wellbeing of the group. For tens of thousands of generations, our species has thrived through developing incredible capacities to work collaboratively and flourish as a group. By working together and using scientifically-evidenced community practices, we learn how to directly enhance our compassion, trust, empathy, cooperation, gratitude, forgiveness, and altruistic skills - among many others.

Self Curiosity

Here we begin to cultivate an interest and wonder about all of our experiences, and using curious questioning to understand ourselves on a deeper level. Our self-curiosity tools empower kids (and adults) to internally cultivate positivity, self-awareness, love, and self-understanding. By using self-curiosity, we become empowered to understand what triggers us emotionally, why, and how our thoughts and perspectives can shape our world. More broadly, our self-curiosity approaches guide you through a series of key questions to generate an attitude of wonder and interest in all of our thoughts, emotions, and sensations. We become Self-Scientists as we explore with wonder any and all experiences -regardless of whether they are pleasurable or painful. Self-Scientists study all of their experiences in a nonjudgmental, objective way so that they can learn more about who they are on the inside.

Contentment

By practicing contentment, we can cultivate unconditional acceptance and appreciation for all experiences, regardless of whether they are pleasant or unpleasant. Instead of obsessing about having more, being more, striving for more, and always wanting more - we can rest in the completeness that is our natural state. In this pillar, we learn that all of our emotions are our friends and allies, each of which has valuable insights to bring to us in order to thrive in the world. Contentment practices empower us to heal our patterns of avoiding some emotions while clinging to others. Through contentment, we can cultivate gratitude, self-compassion, and love toward all of our experiences. By working to understand the situations that make us feel fragmented, we can use simple appreciation and acceptance strategies to find our innate completeness again. Most importantly, we learn ways to challenge our assumptions about “good” or “bad” emotions, and move toward a perspective where all emotions become a beautiful and important part of the human learning experience.

Pillar 1

This concept has to do with cultivating focused, nonjudgmental attention to the present moment, which is a critically important practice for improving self-awareness skills. When we are being mindless, it is easy to become hijacked by intense emotions or ruminating thought patterns, because we’re not focusing our attention on what’s happening right now. When we practice mindfulness, we’re increasing the sensitivity and resolution with which we can sense the world around us and, more importantly, the world inside of us. Over 3,000 studies have been published over the past few decades on the physical, mental, and social benefits of mindfulness techniques. So far, scientists have documented hundreds of observable, reliable health outcomes that mindfulness offers even for a practice as short as 20 minutes a day. Some examples include immune system boosts, increased physical energy, reductions in addiction and trauma impact, and boosts in prosocial behaviors.

Pillar 2

Through community-building practices based on cutting-edge positive psychology research, we learn how to bring out the best in each other by bringing out the best in ourselves. Here we use the energy of the group to maximize the potential for individual development, growth, and self-awareness. Using our community-building tools, we develop cooperation, caretaking, and empathy within our classroom environments. By working together, we begin to support each other’s wellbeing goals and at the same time hold ourselves responsible for contributing to the wellbeing of the group. For tens of thousands of generations, our species has thrived through developing incredible capacities to work collaboratively and flourish as a group. By working together and using scientifically-evidenced community practices, we learn how to directly enhance our compassion, trust, empathy, cooperation, gratitude, forgiveness, and altruistic skills - among many others.

Pillar 3

Here we begin to cultivate an interest and wonder about all of our experiences, and using curious questioning to understand ourselves on a deeper level. Our self-curiosity tools empower kids (and adults) to internally cultivate positivity, self-awareness, love, and self-understanding. By using self-curiosity, we become empowered to understand what triggers us emotionally, why, and how our thoughts and perspectives can shape our world. More broadly, our self-curiosity approaches guide you through a series of key questions to generate an attitude of wonder and interest in all of our thoughts, emotions, and sensations. We become Self-Scientists as we explore with wonder any and all experiences -regardless of whether they are pleasurable or painful. Self-Scientists study all of their experiences in a nonjudgmental, objective way so that they can learn more about who they are on the inside.

Pillar 4

By practicing contentment, we can cultivate unconditional acceptance and appreciation for all experiences, regardless of whether they are pleasant or unpleasant. Instead of obsessing about having more, being more, striving for more, and always wanting more - we can rest in the completeness that is our natural state. In this pillar, we learn that all of our emotions are our friends and allies, each of which has valuable insights to bring to us in order to thrive in the world. Contentment practices empower us to heal our patterns of avoiding some emotions while clinging to others. Through contentment, we can cultivate gratitude, self-compassion, and love toward all of our experiences. By working to understand the situations that make us feel fragmented, we can use simple appreciation and acceptance strategies to find our innate completeness again. Most importantly, we learn ways to challenge our assumptions about “good” or “bad” emotions, and move toward a perspective where all emotions become a beautiful and important part of the human learning experience.




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